Two locations to choose from:  1000 Galloping Hill Rd #202, Union, NJ 07083  |  654 Broadway, Bayonne, NJ 07002

ARTHROSCOPY

 

Arthroscopy is the technique of looking inside a joint by using an instrument called an arthroscope. The arthroscope contains a video camera and is connected to a monitor. Using the arthroscope, we can see what is wrong inside the joint and many times we can also repair the joint if it has been damaged by disease or injury.

What Is Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is the technique of looking inside a joint by using an instrument called an arthroscope. The arthroscope contains a video camera and is connected to a monitor. Using the arthroscope, we can see what is wrong inside the joint and many times we can also repair the joint if it has been damaged by disease or injury. The advantage over open surgery is that recovery is usually quicker after arthroscopic surgery since smaller incisions are made. Disease and injury can damage joints resulting in pain, tenderness, weakness, swelling, instability, and limitation of movement in the shoulder joint. Although symptoms, physical examination, and different types of X-rays and related studies (like CT scans, bone scans, and MRI's) can tell us a great deal about the nature of the problem, we often need to use arthroscopy to determine more precisely what is wrong. After proper examination, we will be able to determine if arthroscopy is right for you. The types of disorders that can be diagnosed with arthroscopy include tears, internal swelling, abnormal formations, detachments, loose fragments (loose bodies), and arthritis. However, arthroscopy is not helpful in diagnosing all conditions. We can also treat a number of conditions with arthroscopy. We are frequently able to remove damaged or diseased tissue. We may also be able to repair and reconstruct certain damaged tissues. The more extensive and involved the procedure, the greater are the chances of causing pain, swelling, and bleeding. The time required for recovery after this kind of treatment procedure is also longer than with diagnostic arthroscopy alone.

 

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Before Surgery

We will order the appropriate lab tests, which can include blood tests, urinalysis, and an EKG (electrocardiogram). You should not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the procedure. Thoroughly wash the area to be arthroscoped before you come in. Immediately before we start the procedure you will be given anesthesia (general, regional, or local, depending on the exact procedure being performed and your general condition).

 

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The Procedure

The arthroscopic procedure itself can take from 30 minutes to several hours. Small incisions (also called portals) are made in the shoulder to allow the arthroscope and surgical instruments to be introduced into the joint. Fluid is pumped in to expand the joint space so the internal structures can be seen clearly. Different instruments are used to trim excess tissue, remove damaged tissue and loose bodies, smooth rough surfaces, and scrape bone to stimulate cartilage growth.

 

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After Surgery

Post-operatively you will be moved to the recovery room. Here your condition will be monitored and the site of surgery will be checked. You will be given such things as a bandage, pain medication, and an ice pack to reduce swelling. Keeping the joint elevated can also help reduce swelling. You will be taught how to exercise so that recovery will be quicker. We will discuss with you how long you should continue with the bandages, ice packs, medications, and exercises at home. Avoid getting the bandage wet while washing. We will schedule follow-up appointments for you to remove your stitches and see how you are doing.

 

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When To Call Us - If you notice any of the following, CALL US (Union office: 908-964-6600, Bayonne office: 201-858-1500).

Fever of 101 º F or more

Persistent pain and swelling

Excessive bleeding

Tingling or numbness

Increased warmth and redness of the joint or surrounding skin

 

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Ankle

One of the most frequent ankle problems treated by arthroscopy is degenerative arthropathy. This condition is often due to injury of the ankle and results in rough joint surfaces. We can arthroscopically smooth these surfaces, or in severe cases we may have to fuse the joint. We can also remove loose bodies and bony spurs, and treat diseases of the (joint lining) synovium and torn ligaments.

 

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Elbow

The elbow is prone to wear and tear, and injury. These may result in loose bodies or bone spurs that need to be removed by arthroscopy, or roughened joint surfaces that need to be smoothed. Synovial problems can also be treated.

 

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Hip

Evaluation of the hip before open surgery and for pediatric disorders can be done with arthroscopy. Evaluation and sometimes treatment of degenerative joint disease due to injury or arthritis may be possible. Loose bodies can be removed and rough areas can be smoothed.

 

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Knee 

Arthroscopy was first used for disorders of the knee joint. One of the most common conditions of the knee treated by this procedure is tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The ACL is the structure that prevents the knee from bending backwards. If it is torn, we may be able to repair or reconstruct (re-build) it, or we may have to remove the torn parts. The medial meniscus and lateral meniscus are made of cartilage and act as shock absorbers inside the knee. Tears of these structures can also be treated by arthroscopy. Loose bodies can be removed. Other problems that can be treated with this procedure include problems of the patella, arthritis, and fracture.

 

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Wrist 

Arthroscopy can be used to diagnose many conditions that are difficult to diagnose by other methods, including torn triangular cartilage. It can be used to remove debris and loose bodies, and smooth rough cartilage.

 

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OFFICE LOCATIONS

 

UNION, NJ

1000 Galloping Hill Rd

#202, Union, NJ 07083

Tel:  908 964-6600

Fax: 908 364-1025  

 

BAYONNE, NJ

654 Broadway,

Bayonne, NJ 07002

Tel: 201 858-1500

OFFICE HOURS

 

Mon -  9am - 6pm     Tues  -    9:30am - 3:30pm

Wed -  9am - 11am   Thurs -   2:30pm - 7:30pm

Fri    -  9am - 3pm     Sat/Sun - Closed

 

BAYONNE HOURS - MON & WED - 1PM - 5PM

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